The Miami Herald published an article on Sunday defending Democratic vice presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., from comparisons to Hillary Clinton, after the hashtag #BlackHillary began trending on social media.

The story cited tweets from former TV anchor Megyn Kelly and actor James Woods which criticized Harris for making faces during the debate against Vice President Mike Pence, with Woods referring to her as a "Valley Girl," who rolled "her eyes like a petulant brat."

The article then cited Ohio Pastor Darrell C. Scott and comments he made about Harris while speaking with Fox News' Laura Ingraham. He referred to the California Democrat as, "Hillary Clinton in blackface," and the #BlackHillary hashtag began to spread.

The Herald did, however, also point to how unpopular Harris is with voters -- a trait she seems to share with Clinton, who had a high unfavorability rating in 2016.

"Clinton was widely disliked," the story continued. "Network exit polls showed that 55 percent of voters had an unfavorable opinion of her. Harris faces similar challenges."

ABORTION AND IMMIGRATION DRIVING FLORIDA LATINO VOTERS TO THE POLLS

The piece also cited pollster Frank Luntz who'd told Fox News, "this was Mike Pence's night" and "the complaint about Kamala Harris was that she was abrasive and condescending."

Luntz said the "smiling, the smirking, the scowling" seemed to irritate voters.

This news comes just one day after Harris, who is a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Catholic faith should not be scrutinized during her upcoming confirmation hearings.

Despite this, Harris signed a letter on Sunday -- along with the rest of the Judiciary Committee -- addressed to the Assistant Attorney General, criticizing Barrett's pro-life ties and demanding she provide a 2006 abortion ad that she signed as a faculty member at the University of Notre Dame.

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The start of Barrett's confirmation process begins Monday and will likely be one of the most bitter, partisan battles for a Supreme Court seat in the country's recent memory.